Starbucks Ad Influenced by Their Lean Education?

Mark Graban

By Mark Graban. Source: The Lean Blog.

Here’s some weekend fun leading into the holiday season… I received a marketing email today from Starbucks that included a phrase that would jump out at any Lean thinker.

Who knows how broadly the Starbucks Lean education efforts have gotten into the marketing department… or this is just a fun Lean coincidence… full ad appears below.

Here’s the portion of the ad that jumped out at me:

starbucks JIT1 500x178 Starbucks Ad Influenced by Their Lean Education? lean

You should be able to view the full ad online by clicking here. It’s reminding people that they can order online through December 20 and still have items shipped to you by Christmas… if you’re new to “Lean,” the phrase “Just-In-Time” refers to a production and materials management strategy that’s one of the core Lean methods – producing or delivering supplies just as they are needed, typically in smaller batches at a higher frequency. Lean or the Toyota Production System was, for a period, often just referred to as “JIT,” but that misses the larger Lean management system to only focus on the JIT piece.

3 Reasons the General Public Doesn’t Think Healthcare Can Improve

Mark Graban

Lean thinkers see the waste in healthcare when they are at the hospital “gemba“. I think this is true whether you are a Lean person who is new to healthcare or if you’re a long-time hospital person who has learned Lean. Experts (doctors) ranging from John Toussaint to Patricia Gabow to Don Berwick all estimate that between 30 to 50% of healthcare spending is waste.

It seems that, often, when you take this sort of discussion to the general public, people react emotionally as if “reducing waste” equates to not providing people the care they deserve – they think Lean healthcare is about taking away, instead of reducing cost and improving quality. I think this happens even outside of charged political circles. Why is that? I have a theory.

Some of the common waste is described in this article about a new Master’s Degree program at Dartmouth:

Disney knows precisely how to gauge the wait for rides at its theme parks.

Major airlines know how to maintain near-perfect safety records on their aircraft.

But hospitals? Most don’t know how to avoid making patients wait — some just build bigger waiting rooms.

Medical centers spend increasing amounts of money on patients, but don’t necessarily deliver better care.

And estimates suggest that each year in the United States there are 15 million incidents of medical harm, some of which result in injury or death.

Now, a new master’s degree program at Dartmouth College is intended to bring more of the business of safety, cost-effectiveness, and efficiency into medicine

My theory is that the general public puts a lot of faith in our healthcare system – blame TV or the movies, I guess. Would they think that a program like Dartmouth’s is even needed?

I think people find it hard to believe the 30 to 50% waste estimates because they assume healthcare is fundamentally pretty perfect, or that it should be.

It breaks down into three categories… because we have the following, we should already have perfect waste-free healthcare delivery:

  1. We have highly trained, motivated people who care a great deal about patients
  2. We have relatively new, modern hospital buildings
  3. We have amazing healthcare technology (equipment, software, and medical knowledge)

So what could go wrong, given those three things? Yet, Lean thinkers know the overall system just doesn’t work. I think it’s hard for the general public to see that 1+2+3 = a lot of waste when they would likely assume 1+2+3 = awesome.

So when errors occur, the general public wants to blame and punish individuals – assuming they must be bad people working in an awesome system. When cost is high, people want to blame the greedy or the incompetent. People don’t tend to look at the overall system, they wouldn’t expect the problem is bad processes, not bad people. The general public assumes quality is good, when the data show otherwise.

It’s safe to say there are indeed a lot of great things about modern healthcare (see 1, 2, and 3, above). But we don’t get the high quality and patient safety we deserve and we, in America, certainly spend way more than we have to — and this high spending is partly due to waste, not due to 1, 2, and 3.

Do you think the public shares that perspective that I described above? Does that common (and arguably incorrect) view get in the way of the public calling for real systemic improvement that reduces cost and improves quality/safety? If so, how can we change that perception that 1+2+3 automatically equals awesome?